• Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    G-S-T Review…KIN

    As cinemas and studios close the books on Summer, it’s a good bet film fans weren’t expecting many more wows on the big screen. Well, if you need a surefire thrill-ride, look no further than Lionsgate’s Kin – the feature-length debut from Australian born, Los Angeles-based directors Jonathan & Josh Baker. The duo craft their first narrative feature, Kin, based on their 2014 sci-fi short, “Bag Man” (check it out here). They already have accomplished careers in marketing/advertising (and the film is full of beautifully gritty shots they no doubt honed in the last 15 years), but I’m positive they’re going to take off. A lot can be said for these artists making…

  • Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    G-S-T Review…Solo: A Star Wars Story

    A long time ago, as the story goes, there was a scruffy-looking space smuggler. Well, this story is about that beloved scoundrel, only younger and he had yet to herd nerfs. So goes Solo: A Star Wars Story. Aside from being a film people may have wanted (but audiences didn’t need), you might have heard stories about directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller leaving the project (from a script by Lawrence and Jonathan Kasdan) and Ron Howard coming aboard. Yup, creative changes certainly abound when putting together a Star Wars story these days. The good news is that the film is steeped in reverence, and a lot of fun. And more…

  • Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    G-S-T Review…Avengers: Infinity War

    ​It may sound incredibly trite and unoriginal to state this, but Avengers: Infinity War is the best Marvel movie to date. It’s an accurate statement to describe an event ten years in the making, and you’re likely to see top film critics quote something similar in trailers and ads after the film’s release. Like the events in the story, the success of Infinity War is a team effort for which you can credit the studio, the producers, and the directors they trust with these dense narratives to ensure that each new story will top the previous effort. Each of these characters has grown in the last decade, and you really can…

  • Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    G-S-T Review…Ready Player One

    Sometimes, movies and stories speak to us on a level that is hard to comprehend or even put into words. Cinematic experiences can dazzle and inspire or, on the contrary, confound and confuse us. But if done well, the trip is worth taking again and again. To some it’s art, to others it’s escapism, but a break from reality is one thing – the desire to live in that reality is quite another. So enter Steven Spielberg whose resume reads largely of some of the finest and impacting films in cinema history. Some of his films are so cherished and captivating that fans would do anything be ‘in’ right along…

  • Fantastic Fest,  Festivals,  Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    G-S-T Review…The Osiris Child: Science Fiction Volume One

    Editor’s Note: This review has been republished. It originally posted with the rest of our reviews and coverage at Fantastic Fest last September. Seemingly from outer space (Australia, really) comes The Osiris Child: Science Fiction Volume One. This lost ’80s era space opera is a breath of fresh air that comes at a time when one doesn’t see this kind of film too often. Furthermore, it’s not of the post-apocalyptic variety, which also adds a refreshing angle. What starts as a slow build, Shane Abbess‘ stellar and ambitious sci-fi gem quickly picks up speed and never looks back. Abbess’ feature has many strengths, and right out of the gates the visuals simply sing with a slick and refined production design.…

  • Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    G-S-T Review…Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

    After four decades, it’s possible that some Star Wars fans probably didn’t expect significant new yarns could be spun in the universe they love so much. Well, with Rogue One, Gareth Edwards and company crafted the mother of all lead-ins to that tale which took place a long time ago. That’s right. In case you hadn’t heard, Rogue One happens right before Episode IV. So it’s a really bold move leaning a modern story up against the crawl that started it all. While the prequels are something that (increasingly, and over time) many fans wish hadn’t happened, there are some redeeming elements to those films. As such, Rogue One serves…

  • Fantastic Fest,  Festivals,  Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    [Fantastic Fest Review]…Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

    Tim Burton provides such a distinct look, feel, and texture to every one of his films — regardless of how you might feel about them — that he’s very much a genre unto himself. Taking a heavy influence from landmark German Expressionist films, he’s pioneering this generation’s brand of wacky, dark-tinged cinema as his creations have danced across the screen for more than a quarter of a century. Yet, as we’ve seen in his recent efforts, a little too much creative freedom — as in all of it — can yield the most unwieldy or disastrous of narratives. For his latest effort, Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, the eccentric director gets to do what he…

  • Fantastic Fest,  Festivals,  Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    [Fantastic Fest Review]…The Young Offenders

    “There are two things you need for a good adventure: a treasure map, and someone dumb enough to go with you.” If you were to read that, you might just be inclined to follow the person who said it. If not, you might just miss out on one hell of a wild ride. The Young Offenders, the debut feature from Peter Foott, is a story about never-do-wells just trying to get ahead despite being completely out of options. Essentially, this can be seen as a comical call to action for those with zero opportunities. As someone once said, “If you don’t know where you’re going, any road will get you there.” And these…

  • Fantastic Fest,  Festivals,  Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    [Fantastic Fest Review]…They Call Me Jeeg Robot

    If you’re just about numb to comic book films these days, then allow this quaint Italian picture to cleanse your palette. The debut feature-length effort from from Gabriele Mainetti seems like a fresh yet familiar take on this type of film; it also reminds once how much fun this type of story can be sans all the machismo and infighting. They Call Me Jeeg Robot is an impressive piece of work, with violence to spare, but it doesn’t glamorize heroes or villains. That’s an important thing to note because it also earns points for originality even if the story is of the passé “hero born of toxic waste” variety. It’s rare to pair the words “origin…

  • Fantastic Fest,  Festivals,  Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    [Fantastic Fest Review]…A Dark Song

    At Fantastic Fest, the largest genre film festival in the United States, you tend to get two types of films. First, there’s the wacky, chimerical, excess-for-the-sake-of-it, ratings-be-damned insanity. Then you get the very pensive, David Fincher- or David Lynch-type narratives. A Dark Song, the debut effort from Irish film director Liam Gavin, is very much the latter. An expertly constructed film, and one that moves at a snail’s pace, asks you to not just have the patience of the main character, Sophia (Catherine Walker), but also have faith that the payoff is worth all the prep. A Dark Song is a claustrophobic picture about a woman who, following the traumatic loss of her son, has…

  • Fantastic Fest,  Festivals,  Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    [Fantastic Fest Review]…Terry Teo

    Four years ago, Danger 5 screened at Fantastic Fest to a welcome response. In 2014, Wastelander Panda was met with similar acclaim. Now, a similarly entertaining and fairly wacky television show arrives, this time from Housebound writer/director Gerard Johnstone no less. We’d like to introduce Terry Teo. Whether you’re familiar with book series that inspired this (and the popular ’80s children’s television series it spawned) is irrelevant. In less than 60 seconds, we learn a whole lot about Terry, the teenage cat burglar, as soon as he opens his mouth. After entering a property that is clearly not his dwelling, Terry takes off his shoes and proclaims, “I know I’m robbing the place, but that’s no reason to be disrespectful.” And so…

  • Fantastic Fest,  Festivals,  Movies/Entertainment,  Reviews

    [Fantastic Fest Review]…Dearest Sister

    People say that there is art through adversity. As such, to begin, it’s worth stating that Mattie Do‘s latest feature is the 13th film to come out of Laos… in its history. Furthermore, it is worth noting that she is a female filmmaker in a Marxist state. So while the country is fraught with local censorship, Do is able to deliver quality films in a place where there is no film industry or infrastructure for that kind of entertainment. Creative struggles are one thing, but judging the finished product, Dearest Sister is an admittedly hard film to review. The premise seems straightforward, yet vague enough to pique your interest: “After moving to the city, a poor…